Leather soaks up oil like jow a sponge absorbs water, and that can make oil stains difficult to remove. An oil-absorbing agent, such as talcum powder or cornstarch, will pull the oil back out of the leather so you can safely clean it off.

Here are some tips:

Do

  • Understand the type of leather you’re dealing with before applying any powder. For example, if it is bycast leather, applying powder will not work
  • Blot the oil stain with a paper towel. After a few dabs, discard the towel and continue blotting with a new one. Keep doing this until the paper towel stops absorbing oil
  • Cover the oil stain completely with a thick layer of cornstarch, dry sand or talcum powder
  • Let the powder set overnight before brushing it off with a toothbrush

Don't

  • Never use alcohol-based degreasers that are sold in the market on semi-aniline or natural leather. This will cause color loss and oil stains
  • Never rub off remaining powder with a cloth as the powder might get stuck in between the threads or fine grains of your item. This actually makes it more difficult to clean later on

More must-have tips

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Leather soaks up oil like jow a sponge absorbs water, and that can make oil stains difficult to remove. An oil-absorbing agent, such as talcum powder or cornstarch, will pull the oil back out of the leather so you can safely clean it off.

Here are some tips:

Do

  • Understand the type of leather you’re dealing with before applying any powder. For example, if it is bycast leather, applying powder will not work
  • Blot the oil stain with a paper towel. After a few dabs, discard the towel and continue blotting with a new one. Keep doing this until the paper towel stops absorbing oil
  • Cover the oil stain completely with a thick layer of cornstarch, dry sand or talcum powder
  • Let the powder set overnight before brushing it off with a toothbrush

Don't

  • Never use alcohol-based degreasers that are sold in the market on semi-aniline or natural leather. This will cause color loss and oil stains
  • Never rub off remaining powder with a cloth as the powder might get stuck in between the threads or fine grains of your item. This actually makes it more difficult to clean later on

More must-have tips

[apss-share]

Leather soaks up oil like jow a sponge absorbs water, and that can make oil stains difficult to remove. An oil-absorbing agent, such as talcum powder or cornstarch, will pull the oil back out of the leather so you can safely clean it off.

Here are some tips:

Do

  • Understand the type of leather you’re dealing with before applying any powder. For example, if it is bycast leather, applying powder will not work
  • Blot the oil stain with a paper towel. After a few dabs, discard the towel and continue blotting with a new one. Keep doing this until the paper towel stops absorbing oil
  • Cover the oil stain completely with a thick layer of cornstarch, dry sand or talcum powder
  • Let the powder set overnight before brushing it off with a toothbrush

Don't

  • Never use alcohol-based degreasers that are sold in the market on semi-aniline or natural leather. This will cause color loss and oil stains
  • Never rub off remaining powder with a cloth as the powder might get stuck in between the threads or fine grains of your item. This actually makes it more difficult to clean later on

More must-have tips

[apss-share]